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Briefings - 786. page

Show Contempt for U.S. Pressure

On December 24, 2007, Xinhua published an article under the title "Let’s Learn to Show Contempt for U.S. Pressure." It stated that China can hardly breathe because of the pressure in international trade. The pressure relates to such issues as RMB currency depreciation, product recalls, over 50 anti-China bills presently in the U.S. Congress and escalating demands on China to open up its financial market.

The Chinese Government’s Liaison Office in Hong Kong Concerned about Dr. Sun Yat-sen’s Grandnephew

Axiang (an alias), a Hong Kong Democracy activist revealed to the Epoch Times that he has often been contacted by the Liaison Office of the Chinese Government in the Hong Kong S.A.R. [1] (LOCPG) over the past several years. Recently, the LOCPG contacted him to get information about Hong Kong people participating in the Quit the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) Movement. Axiang told the reporter that three thugs attacked Albert Ho Chun-yan (何俊仁), the chair of the Democratic Party (Hong Kong) and a member of the Legislative Council, because he protested the CCP’s harvesting organs from live Falun Gong practitioners and supported the civil rights movement in Mainland China. The LOCPG told Axiang that it will treat Mr. Sun Bin, the grandnephew of Dr. Sun Yat-Sen , [2] the same way it treated Mr. Ho. [3]

Chinese Have Mixed Feelings about Foreign Companies

A survey sampling 1,000 citizens in major cities in China was published in the August issue of Global Enrepeneur Magazine. It reveals that the Chinese public has mixed feelings about foreign companies doing business in China.   

On the one hand, the results showed that over 80 percent of those surveyed think that the foreign companies have promoted economic development in China. On the other hand, 73.1 percent expressed strong dissatisfaction towards the foreign companies as they have "relocated environmentally hazardous industries and factories to China."

College Tuitions Have Skyrocketed in the Ten Years Since Combining Tracks

In 1997, colleges in China combined the tracks for the tuition system. Previously there existed two tracks: one track was that most college students paid nothing or only nominal fees for a college education; the other track was that some students financially supported their college education. Various scholars have found that since the two tracks were combined, most students have had to pay the full tuition. College tuitions across the country have skyrocketed. [1]