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Breaching the Great Wall

Free information flow is a an integral part of the fabric of democracy, something that is currently unavailable in China. In an assessment of the Chinese media, the BBC wrote on its website,

“China’s media are tightly controlled by the country’s leadership. Beijing also attempts to restrict access to foreign news providers by jamming shortwave radio broadcasts, including those of the BBC, and blocking access to web sites.

“The Chinese press report on corruption and inefficiency among officials, but the media as a whole refrain from criticizing the Chinese Communist Party’s monopoly on power.”

In recent years, a number of private organizations have begun to pose a challenge to the Chinese government’s censorship. These organizations, often non-profit and staffed with volunteers, operate on a minimal budget. Surprisingly, they have managed to achieve significant results.

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From the Editor

Every March, representatives of the National People’s Congress and members of the Political Consultative Conferences gather in Beijing for the annual “Two Conferences.” The conferences are meant to be platforms for the delegates to voice their local citizens’ concerns to the central government and make policies to solve the country’s most pressing issues.

This year, it was widely hoped that the government would do something to buoy the stock market, which hit a new six-year low after a four-year slide. However, the government had a different agenda in mind. The People’s Congress unanimously passed an “anti-secession” law, which mandates the use of military force if Taiwan declares independence. The news caught many China observers by surprise and served as a reminder of China’s militant mindset.

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Prostitutes Help Censorship?

On November 27, an explosion occurred at Lianhua Science and Technology Inc. of Yancheng City, Jiangsu Province, causing dozens of deaths. After the incident, the city government launched an emergency response mechanism and managed to deter 69 journalists with 21 media outlets including Xinhua News Agency, China Youth Daily, China News Services, Xinhua daily, and Jiangsu TV Stations from covering the incident. Surprisingly, the local government sent prostitutes to the reporter’s hotel rooms, and in addition resorted to bribery and police force in an effort to make sure that the incident was “correctly” reported.

Source: Chinese Media Net, December 31, 2007
http://www6.chinesenewsnet.com/gb/MainNews/Forums/BackStage/2007_12_31_9_52_43_426.html

Xinhua Proclaims 2008 Belongs to China

On New Year’s Day of 2008, China’s state media Xinhua posted a slogan, “2008, the World Belongs to China” as the headline on its website’s World Report section. The slogan was later changed to “2008, the World Expects that China Appear in Perfect Form.” On the same page, the website published two articles that predict that the United States will slide downhill. One, quoted as “by Japanese media,” bears the title, “The American Era Is Ending.” The other one, quoted from Financial Times, is titled “The Era of U.S. Dollar’s Dominance No Longer Exists.”

Source: Xinhuanet, January 1, 2008
http://news.xinhuanet.com/world/2008-01/01/content_7347547.htm

Xinhua Proclaims 2008 Belongs to China

On the New Year’s Day of 2008, China’s state media Xinhua posted a slogan “2008, the World Belongs to China” in the headline at its website’s World Report section. The slogan was later changed to “2008, the World Expects that China Appears in Perfect Form.” On the other hand, the website also republished on the same page two articles that predict the downhill slide of the United States. One, quoted as “by Japanese media,” runs a title of “The American Era Is Ending.” The other one, quoted from Financial Times, is titled “The Era of U.S. Dollar’s Dominance Is No Longer Existent.”

 

Source: Xinhuanet, January 1, 2008

http://news.xinhuanet.com/world/2008-01/01/content_7347547.htm

Xinhua Proclaims 2008 Belongs to China

On the New Year’s Day of 2008, China’s state media Xinhua posted a slogan “2008, the World Belongs to China” in the headline at its website’s World Report section. The slogan was later changed to “2008, the World Expects that China Appears in Perfect Form.” On the other hand, the website also republished on the same page two articles that predict the downhill slide of the United States. One, quoted as “by Japanese media,” runs a title of “The American Era Is Ending.” The other one, quoted from Financial Times, is titled “The Era of U.S. Dollar’s Dominance Is No Longer Existent.”

 

Source: Xinhuanet, January 1, 2008

http://news.xinhuanet.com/world/2008-01/01/content_7347547.htm