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US-China Relations

Huanqiu: US-China Economic and Security Review Commission 2017 Annual Report Thrilled Overseas Anti-China Forces

Well-known Chinese news site Sina published an article that Huanqiu had originally carried. It reported that the 2017 Annual Report that the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission published “resulted in excitement among those who are hostile to China.” The article stated that the annual report came after Trump’s visit to China and has puzzled some mainstream media, politicians, and anti-China organizations. Trump not only didn’t criticize China but also had many positive exchanges with China. The article said that the annual report “painted China as the enemy of the U.S. and a malignant cell in the world. It provided counter-measures and absurd directions for U.S. media, politicians, and anti-China agencies to pursue in their work.” It called the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission headed by Carolyn Bartholomew the home base of “anti-China hostile forces.” It noted that Carolyn Bartholomew, who worked for Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi, has helped Pelosi draft many “anti-China” bills.

Source: Sina, November 16, 2017
http://news.sina.com.cn/c/nd/2017-11-16/doc-ifynwxum1766154.shtml

Duowei: Trump Is More of an Arms Dealer Taking Advantage of Japan and South Korea’s Crisis

Duowei, a Beijing controlled media based overseas, published an article commenting on President Trump’s Asian trip. Below is an excerpt from the article:

“U.S. President Trump visited South Korea on November 7. During the welcoming ceremony of the Korean President Moon Jae-in at The Blue House Cheongwadae, Trump’s first concern was the issue of arms sales to South Korea, which he believed would help to reduce the trade deficit between the two countries. Two days before Trump was to visit Japan, he also demanded that Japan should purchase a ‘massive’ amount of weapons from the United States, including missiles and fighters. Trump’s demands on Japan and South Korea are ostensibly aimed at responding to the DPRK’s nuclear threat. Actually, all these efforts are aimed at increasing employment in the United States and changing the trade imbalance between the U.S. and Japan and South Korea. This was also evident during the first three stops of his Asian tour. Japan, South Korea, and China are the three targets of the Treasury Department for the manipulation of exchange rates. They are also Donald Trump’s three stakeholders on this trip to resolve the North Korean nuclear issue. “

“It can be said that Trump is very pragmatic to use the threat of the North Korean nuclear crisis to sell arms to U.S. allies. It is also {clear} from this point that Trump did not have any big strategic design for his trip to Asia. Instead, it is an extension of the principle of ‘the U.S. first.’ The White House stressed that Trump’s visit to Asia has three themes: the DPRK nuclear issue, the Indo-China Pacific region, and business trade. However, judging from Trump’s words and deeds during his visit, all three topics are ultimately related to ‘money.’ In other words, let allies give ‘money’ in return for their own safety. “

“All in all, the Trump, who is currently visiting Asia, does not look like a president. He looks more like a businessman who sells arms to the allies. However, as president, everything on his mind relates to how to cut down the foreign trade deficit and give an explanation to his diehard voters in order to ease the domestic pressure of governance.”

Source: Duowei, November 7, 2017
http://news.dwnews.com/global/news/2017-11-07/60022096.html

Global Times Asks Why China Cannot Openly Support Enemies of the U.S.

Last December, then U.S. President-elect Donald Trump said on Fox News Sunday, “I don’t know why we have to be bound by a ‘one China’ policy unless we make a deal with China having to do with other things, including trade.”

In response to Trump’s remarks, Global Times, a subsidiary of the Chinese Communist Party’s flagship newspaper People’s Daily, published an editorial the following day, December 12, 2016, questioning why China cannot openly support enemies of the United States.

The editorial acknowledged that Western media could have got it right, that Trump’s taking a congratulatory phone call from Taiwan’s president on December 2 could indicate that he was willing to trade the ‘one China’ policy for his short term gains.

Global Times went on to ridicule Trump’s business orientation as well as his lack of diplomatic savviness, observing that Trump figured that he could place a price on everything. Global Times posed the question, “How much would the U.S. constitution be worth if we ask Americans to trade it for an alternate political system of U.S. allies, such as Saudi Arabia or Singapore.

The editorial went on, “It appears that China has to engage in a round of resolute fighting and, through some setbacks, Trump may realize that he cannot easily take advantage of China or other forces in the world.”

The Global Times‘ editorial made it clear that, in case Trump gives up on the “one China” policy, publicly supports “Taiwan independence,” and sells weapons to Taiwan without restraint, there would be no need for Beijing to resist or cut ties with those forces that are against the U.S. The Global Times asked, “Why can we not publicly support them or provide them with weapons in private?”

The editorial asked, “When Trump publicly renounces the ‘one China’ policy, is there any more need for Beijing to attach more priority to peaceful unification than to claiming Taiwan by force?”

It concluded that the days were long gone when the U.S. dominated the Taiwan strait; in the end, the forces of Taiwan independence will grow so scared, its administration will regret having acted as a pawn of Trump, and their leader may refuse to take phone calls that Trump has initiated.

Source:
Global Times, December 12, 2016
http://opinion.huanqiu.com/editorial/2016-12/9797239.html

Xinhua Interview: What to Expect from Trump’s First Visit to China

Xinhuanet had an exclusive interview with Diao Daming, an associate professor at the School of International Relations at Renmin University of China, discussing the important aspects of U.S. President Donald Trump’s visit to China from China’s perspective.

Diao Daming believes that the significance of this visit lies mainly in building a new type of international relationship and a common community of human destinies. The foundation of this new type of international relationship will be the building of a new type of Sino-U.S. Relationship.

Regarding the factors to which China should pay attention on this visit, Diao discussed the following:

The first important factor is whether this visit can form a consensus position for Sino-U.S. relations in the new era.

“As China moves to the center stage of the world and takes an active position in shaping the relations between China and the United States, it is noteworthy whether the Trump administration has a positive and clear expression toward the issues that concern China, such as the AIIB and the One Belt and Road initiative. We should pay attention to whether the United States responds to our above concerns.”

In addition, this visit will be the third official meeting between Xi and Trump. As Trump’s first visit to China this year, another factor to consider is whether or not there are special arrangements and special forms to enhance the mutual trust between the leaders of the two countries and between the two countries.

Source: Xinhua, November 7, 2017
http://news.xinhuanet.com/world/2017-11/07/c_129734169.htm

RFI Chinese: Chinese Drug Lords Replace South Americans as Primary U.S. Drug Suppliers

Radio France Internationale (RFI) recently reported that U.S. President Trump declared national public health emergencies twice this year because of the opioid epidemic. According to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration and The White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, China is the supplier of almost the entire source of opioid type drugs, the main one being Fentanyl. Fentanyl is around ten times stronger than Heroin. Proven records show that at least 12 Chinese drug companies have had online commercials claiming they could export Fentanyl to the United States and Canada for US$2,750 per kilogram. Most of the Chinese Fentanyl was first shipped to Mexico and then smuggled into the United States. The Chinese supplied all of the opioid drugs that a recently captured New York 34-person drug dealership retailed. In fact, all of the drug cartels that were cracked down on this year sourced their opioid drugs from China. The latest illegal marijuana-planting group arrested in California after the state’s legalization of marijuana was Chinese and Chinese sources funded the group.

Source: RFI Chinese, October 31, 2017
http://bit.ly/2A85LSA

LTN: The FBI Nearly Arrested Chinese Officials

The major Taiwanese news source, Liberty Times Network (LTN), recently reported that China sent four State Security officials to the United States in May to try to convince the exiled Chinese businessman Guo Wengui to return to China. One of the four agents was Liu Yanping, Secretary of the Commission for Discipline Inspection of the Ministry of State Security. The Chinese government asked Guo to stop talking about topics involving political scandal, as he had been doing for months. The FBI followed the Chinese agents for their entire trip and nearly arrested them before they boarded their return flight. However, because the White House, the State Department, the Department of Justice, and the Pentagon could not reach an agreement on this action, they called off the arrest. In the end, the FBI did confiscate the cell phones that belonged to the Chinese officials. The U.S. government decided to protect Guo Wengui, due to his deep insider knowledge of Chinese politics, and because of his use as a “bargaining chip.”

Source: Liberty Times Network, October 23, 2017
http://news.ltn.com.tw/news/world/breakingnews/2231269

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