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Guo Wengui on China’s Plan to Ruin the United States

After his speech at the Hudson Institute was cancelled, Guo Wengui, a former Chinese business tycoon from China who is now actively exposing the Communist Party officials’ corruption, issued a press release and held a press conference at the National Press Club on October 5.

Guo showed those present a document, claiming it was a top secret document from China, dated April 27, 2017. The title was, “The Response of the Office of the State Council regarding the Office of the (Communist Party’s) Central National Committee’s Plan to Secretly Send 27 State Security Officers including He Jianfeng to the U.S. to Perform Job Duties.” Guo said that He Jianfeng was from the State Security office and was mainly responsible for collecting intelligence on the U.S. and for controlling the spy network there. “Twenty eight people except He have already come to the United States. Their main base was the Bank of China in New York. Also (some went to) the Chinese Embassy in Washington, D.C. and to some Chinese organizations. Another 50 people came (to the U.S.) later.” The Chinese government later denied the authenticity of the document.

Guo stated that China has a complete “BGY” plan to control the world. “BGY” stands for, “The plan (which) includes Blue (control the Internet), Gold (buy influence with money), and Yellow (seduce key people with sex). Guo also said that China has a second plan called “3F” and both plans are to ruin the U.S. and to assure that China controls the world.

Source: myanniu.com (Guo Wengui’s website), October 5, 2017
http://www.myanniu.com/?p=2077

Guo Wengui: Jiang Zemin’s Dark Silent Force in the U.S. Conquered the Hudson Institute

Guo Wengui, a former Chinese business tycoon who is now actively exposing Communist Party officials’ corruption, had planned to give a speech at the Hudson Institute on October 4. However, the think tank notified him one day before the speech that the event had been cancelled.

Hudson Institute spokesperson David Tell said that the institute received emails from China, protesting the event. Bill Gertz from The Washington Free Beacon, who was supposed to host Guo’s speech, said that the Chinese Embassy pressured his newspaper multiple times and even threatened to deny its scholar the right to visit China.

The Hudson Institute also received a cyber attachment from Shanghai.

Guo Wengui commented that people related to Jiang Zemin {Former General Secretary of the Communist Party of China from 1989 to 204} might have maneuvered the cancellation.

Guo disclosed earlier that, from 2004 to 2008, Jiang Zemin’s son Jiang Mianheng (江绵恒) had three kidney transplants which involved killing five people. His surgeon was found to have “jumped out of his building.” The surgeon’s family members fled to Malaysia and China’s State Security officers persuaded them to return to China. They flew there in Malaysia’s airplane #370 on March 8, 2014. That plane went missing forever.

“An American said (to me) that Jiang Mianheng (江绵恒) was very unhappy with my exposing his organ transplants. (He) said that was a main reason that the Hudson Institute speech was cancelled. (He) said that (I) cannot prove (Jiang Mianheng’s transplants) nor can I prove that the surgeon’s family members died on Malaysia’s airplane #370.”

“I have never commented on (Jiang Mianheng’s) organ transplants. I only talked about the fact. Jiang Mianheng had three kidney transplants. Five people died! Who were these five people? Why did they have to die after their kidneys were removed?”

“Jiang Mianheng used Jiang Zemin’s dark silent force in the U.S. to conquer the Hudson Institute!”

Sources:

1. Radio Free Asia, October 4, 2017
http://www.rfa.org/cantonese/news/US-guo-10042017155917.html
2. myanniu.com (Guo Wengui’s website), October 4, 2017
http://www.myanniu.com/?p=2052

 

Beijing’s Network of Informants

China’s Legal Evening News had a detailed report on Chaoyang Qun Zhong (朝阳群众), a well-known group of police’s informants in Chaoyang District in Beijing.

The Chinese netizens called the group the “world’s fifth ace intelligence organization.” It was formed many years ago. In 1974, informants from this group helped the police arrest six spies in Beijing.

Chaoyang District has about 3.84 million residents. The Chaoyang Qun Zhong group claims to have about 190,000 participants, with over 130,000 registered using their real names. The average number is about 277 per square kilometer. Active members are around 60,000. They provide over 20,000 tips to the police every month.

For example, the Huayanbeili West Neighborhood has 7,000 residents. Nearly 1,000 participate in the voluntary patrol or watch.

The Chaoyang District government pays these activists 300 to 500 yuan (US$50–$80) per month. If any volunteer has an accident during security duty, he can receive up to 1.2 million yuan (US$180,000) in insurance payments and several hundred thousand yuan in financial subsidies from the district’s security funds.

These informants are all over Beijing, totaling over 850,000 volunteers.

Source: Legal Evening News, September 22, 2017
http://dzb.fawan.com/html/2017-09/22/content_13072.htm

Is Jian Yang a Chinese Spy?

A number of English media and Chinese media reported that Jian Yang (杨健), an MP in the New Zealand government and a member of its ruling National Party, might be a Chinese spy.

Jian Yang was born in Jiangxi Province in China. He earned his Master and Ph. D. degree in International Relations from the Australian National University. Then in 1999, the University of Auckland in New Zealand hired him as a Senior Lecturer in Political Studies. In 2011, he was elected as an MP from the National Party.

The issue was that Yang didn’t disclose his experiences as both a student and instructor at two military schools in China whose main duty is to produce spies. The two schools are the Air Force Engineering College and the Luoyang PLA University of Foreign Languages.

Some of the English media focused on how much Yang had disclosed to the New Zealand government and whether he vowed to be loyal to New Zealand. However, that discussion may not be that relevant since what Yang disclosed (or did not disclose) does not prove (or disprove) he is a spy. In all probability, a spy would not disclose anything that would even hint that he is a spy. A person who is not a spy might not choose to disclose anything either.

So whether Yang is a spy may be left to the intelligence office to decide.

Lianhe Zaobao, the largest Singapore-based Chinese-language newspaper stated, “The two universities belong to the PLA and are the key places where China trains its spies.” It also quoted an expert who said, “Yang almost certainly works for the PLA.”

Source: Lianhe Zaobao, September 13, 2017
http://www.zaobao.com.sg/realtime/china/story20170913-794975

 

Copyright Battle between Sina and Netizens

Sina is a major Internet portal in China. Sina Weibo is a microblog social network, with more than 500 million users and millions of posts per day. Based on active users, it claims 56.5 percent of the Chinese microblogging market.

Recently, Sina tried to claim exclusive copyrights for all contents posted on Sina Weibo. The public fiercely rejected its claim, so eventually Sina conceded the copyrights to the microblog’s author.

Sina’s first announcement stated that, “Sina has the exclusive copyright over the contents that its users publish on Sina Weibo; Sina Weibo users authorize Sina Weibo, for free, to protect copyrights. The proceeds from the protection of these copyrights belongs solely to the Weibo platform; the user actively agrees to support Weibo‘s platform to exercise its rights and to provide related proving documents and support.’”

After the public’s outcry, Sina issued its second version of the announcement and modified the two articles that caused the public debate: “(Sina Weibo) users can legally use the contents over which they have the absolute intellectual properties’ right including the copyright, but retrieving contents published on the Weibo platform without the joint approval of the user and the Weibo platform is an act of unfair competition.”

It still met with the public’s rejection.

Sina then issued its third version: “The copyright of the contents published on Weibo for sure belongs to the author of the contents. Weibo, as a platform, has certain usage rights. The Weibo user can publish his own contents on other platforms at his own will. However, without the Weibo platform’s agreement, (the user’s) self-authorizing, allowing, or assisting a third party to retrieve published content on Weibo is not permitted.”

Source: Jiansu Toutiao, September 17, 2017
http://www.jiangsutoutiao.com/a/170917144740391-4.html

Chinese’ Total Bank Savings Amount Is Less Than Total Mortgage Amount

China’s National Bureau of Statistics recently reported that, by the end of 2016, the total amount of resident’s bank savings had reached 60 trillion yuan (US$9 trillion). However an article in the China Business Journal argued that the number is alarmingly small compared to housing prices and mortgage amounts.

Since China has 1.3 billion people, the average bank savings is 46,000 yuan per person. In Beijing’s the average bank savings is 130,000 yuan, the highest in the nation. However, the average housing price in Beijing is 5 million yuan. How can people afford a house?

The article further compared the total mortgage vs. total bank savings in the major cities. The traditional Chinese thinking is not to get in debt, so the author viewed it as a bad thing for the total of mortgages to be higher than the total of bank savings (it would mean that people collectively cannot afford their houses). Several cities fall into this group. For example, take Shenzhen. The total of all mortgages amounts to 1.4 trillion yuan in Shenzhen, but the total bank savings is only 1 trillion yuan.

Source: China Business Journal, September 18, 2017
http://www.cb.com.cn/qijunjie/2017_0918/1199834.html

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